Does my patient have a UTI? (urinary tract infection)

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All too frequently, patients are started on antibiotics for a UTI because of a “positive UA” alone. This should not be! Sometimes, especially if a patient is unstable or really sick, it may be wise to empirically treat for a UTI, but in an otherwise stable patient, please think carefully about whether they truly have a UTI.

Technically, a UTI is defined in part by a positive urine culture that has >10,000 organisms, of no more than two species. (“Mixed genital flora” does not count!) However, often we let this slide if a patient has a “positive UA” and one of the following criteria:

  1. fever >38.0 C
  2. suprapubic tenderness or CVA tenderness
  3. urgency
  4. dysuria
  5. frequency

If a patient has a Foley in place, they will not be able to reliably tell you about urgency, dysuria, or frequency because the Foley catheter itself can cause these symptoms.

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